Archive for July 2010

Adam

July 29, 2010

“That’s my brother!”  —Bob Morales, La Bamba.

Tricolor Bean Harvest

July 27, 2010

Our bush beans have ripened:

We planted a mix of three colors: green, yellow and purple. I’d never had purple beans before.

The purple color makes them easier to find among the leaves.

Despite appearances, they taste the same as green beans, are green inside, and, in fact, turn completely green when cooked. However, compared with the green beans (which I also love),  they seem to continue to taste quite optimally good even if they are picked a bit later than their earliest day of ripeness. I had read this about them, and now I concur. I declare the purple beans a winner; I will certainly grow them again.

We steamed these and ate them with no additional adornment. None seemed necessary.

Twice Baked Guaco-potatoes

July 20, 2010

Last week I had bought a sack of potatoes to make twice baked potatoes. When I got home, I realized I had an avocado as well. I thought, hey, guacopotatoes would be delicious and nutritious. So I made some. I liked them; Beth liked them too, but she preferred the non-guac ones.

Ingredients:

  • 3 baking potatoes
  • 1 avocado
  • 1 tsp minced roasted garlic
  • 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup Monterrey Jack cheese
  • 3/4 cup sour cream
  • salt & pepper to taste

Procedure: Bake the potatoes. Allow to cool long enough to handle safely. Halve the potatoes. Scoop out the insides with a melon-baller or spoon. Mix the potato innards with the sour cream, cheeses,  avocado, roasted garlic, and salt & pepper.  Mash together with a potato masher or large fork. If you like, you can reserve some of the cheese for topping. Spoon the mixture back into the potatoes and put them under the broiler for a few minutes until you get some nice brown spots tops. I really liked the roasted garlic with the avocado in these.

Baby Seagull

July 19, 2010

Have you ever seen a baby seagull? I never had, but my family was visiting last week, and we saw this one on the roof of a building in Portland, ME:

They have polka dotted heads. I think the mother was clever in choosing a roof whose gravel pattern was similar to the coloration of the chick. I got some stills too:

Another day, another coozie

July 8, 2010

I finished my second cabled coozie on the plane back from the GEM meeting. I can attest now that these do work to keep a beer colder longer, and they keep your hand dry, but I don’t have quantitative performance numbers yet. For this one I did twists every 8 rows instead of every 6 like in the blue one. The cable looks a little crooked in the picture, but it’s just because it’s a little twisted on the bottle. This one was knit in Plymouth Galway Worsted. It took 44.1 yards (21 grams) of yarn.

pattern by Karrie Weaver

Alpine Adventure: GEM 2010

July 7, 2010

Two weeks ago I attended the 2010 GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) Summer Workshop. This was maybe the fifth time I’ve attended GEM. It is really a fun science meeting because it is always in a nice hikable western environment, and it is much smaller than many other meetings (less than 400 people). So it is easier to talk at length with many other scientists about a relatively small number of topics. I wish all meetings were around that size. The past two years this meeting has been in Snowmass, Colorado, which is a ski town across the valley from the perhaps somewhat more known, Aspen.

I brought my banjo with me to the meeting, despite the fact that I was flying United, and everyone knows that United breaks guitars. At first I wasn’t sure how to pack the banjo because I have just a soft gig-bag, and I was pretty sure I’d be forced to check it at least on the small plane from Denver to Aspen. However, I realized that I could easily pad the banjo if I disassembled it and stowed it in my internal frame travel backpack. It turns out that disassembling a banjo is really easy. I had the thing completely unstrung and disassembled in about 4 minutes. I hadn’t thought about that advantage of an instrument held together by bolts rather than hide glue. Here’s how the Deering Goodtime looked when I arrived in Snowmass:

Within 25 minutes it was strung up and tuned again—tuned to itself anyway; it was about a minor third flat until I downloaded a tuner.

On the first day of the meeting I decided to go on a hike up the mountain behind the hotel. In the middle of an awful headache the next morning I read that “to avoid altitude sickness when traveling to locations above 8000′ one should avoid strenuous activity and alcohol for 24 hours after arriving at altitude”. The views were nice though, and I found an impressive pile of snow at the base of a ski jump:

I also found a deer or elk print in the mud:

Where did this mud come from? It came from this gurgling mountain stream (such as might be referred to in a Coors Light commercial). Taste the Rockies (but watch out for giardia):

The meeting week also featured my favorite phase of the moon, the waxing gibbous:

I’ve always thought waxing gibbous could easily be the name of a primate species.


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